ChessEbook Logo

ChessEbook.com

Sign In   or   Register (FREE!)
1. Steinitz 2. Lasker 3. Capablanca 4. Alekhine 5. Euwe
6. Botvinnik 7. Smyslov 8. Tal 9. Petrosian 10. Spassky
11. Fischer 12. Karpov 13. Kasparov 14. Kramnik 15. Anand
"Teaching chess must consist in the development of independent thinking." (E. Lasker).
Emanuel LASKER
Born: December 24, 1868 in Berlinchen (nowadays Barlinek), Poland;
died: January 11, 1941 in New York.
The 2-d Chess Champion of the World (1894 - 1921), a chess theorist, a literary man, the author of numerous scientific works and books, the Doctor of Philosophy and Mathematics.
Lasker
Since 1888 E. Lasker started his participation in the Berlin Chess Society tournaments. Since 1889 - in international competitions. Lasker is the winner of numerous international tournaments and matches.
The World Championship Matches:
 
1894, New York, Philadelphia, Montreal. Steinitz - Lasker. Lasker's victory with a convincing advantage - 12 : 7 (+ 10, -5, = 4)
 
1896/97, Moscow The return match Lasker - Steinitz. Lasker kept his World Champion's title with the score of 12,5 : 4,5 (+ 10, - 2, = 5).
 
Lasker retained his Champion's title for as long as 27 years! Defending it, he gained a number of convincing victories:
 
1907, USA Lasker - Marshall. The score - 11.5 : 3.5 (+ 8, - 0, = 7).
 
1908, Dusseldorf, Munich. Lasker - Tarrasch.The score - 10.5 : 5.5 (+ 8, - 3, = 5).
 
1909, Paris. Lasker - Janowski. The score - 8:2 (+ 7, - 1, = 2).
 
1910, Vienna, Berlin. Lasker - Schlechter. For the first time the match ended in a draw: 5 : 5 (+ 1, - 1, = 8). Lasker kept the Champion's title again.
 
1910, Berlin. Lasker - Janowski. One more victory: 9.5 : 1.5 (+ 8, - 0, = 3).
 
1921, Havana. Lasker - Capablanca. Lasker lost with the score of 5 : 9 (+ 0, - 4, = 10).
 
In spite of the Champion's title loss, Lasker continued his successful participation in various competitions: Ostrawa (1923) and New York (1924) - the 1-st place; Moscow (1925 - the 2-d place, 1935 - the 3-d place and 1936 - the 6-th place); Zurich (1934) - the 5-th place, Nottingham (1936) - the 7-8-th place.
Logic, advanced technique, and specific psychological approach to an opponent had organically combined in Lasker's chess creativity. Being the Steinitz's positional theory follower, he extended the teaching on strategic planning and pieces interaction, formulated the most important principles of tactical and psychological struggle.